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NINETEEN SIXTY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://www.archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1960colu 



The Oath of Hippocrates 



I SWEAR by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, & Hygeia, and 
Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to my ability 
and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipulation: to reckon him 
who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my 
substance with him and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon 
his offspring as my own brothers and to teach them this Art, if they shall 
wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, 
and every other mode of instruction I will impart a knowledge of the Art 
to my own sons and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a 
stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. 
I will follow that system of regimen which according to my ability and 
judgment I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from what- 
ever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no deadly medicine to 
anyone if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and in like manner I will 
not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. With purity and with 
holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. I will not cut persons 
laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are 
practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter I will go into 
them for the benefit of the sick and will abstain from every voluntary act 
of mischief and corruption; & further, from the seduction of females or 
males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my profes- 
sional practice or not in connection with it, I see or hear in the life of men 
which ought not to be spoken of abroad. I will not divulge, as reckoning 
that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this oath 
unviolated may it lie granted to me to enjoy life and the practice of the 
Art, respected by all men & all times. But should I trespass and violate 
this oath may the reverse be my lot. 







\ 




iffljpiiy Mill 

illllffil 










College Building on Fourth Avenue and 23rd Strict 
(1856-1887) 



P & S 1960 



i \ % y 




Published by the Fourth Year Class of The College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Columbia University in the City of New York. 





In Memoriam... 



The sudden death of Dr. Aaron Himmelstein brought deep grief to all who 
knew him. In addition to being an inspiring teacher and an outstanding surgeon, 
he was truly a friend of the medical student. His genuine interest in our training 
and in ourselves, coupled with a unique capacity to guide and encourage made 
it a privilege to learn under him. Dr. Himmelstein's contributions to medical sci- 
ence while many were secondary to his eminence as a human being. His life was 
brief but the silence at his passing was long and unbroken. 





Left: Italy, 1943. Above: With Drs. Cournand and 
Harvey in the Bellevue Cardiac Catheterization Unit. 



At a medical meeting 1959. 



With Dr. Turino in the Presbyterian Cardie-Pulmonary 
Laboratory- 






To Rustin Mcintosh 



To Rustin Mcintosh, in gratitude for his exemplification 
of sound leadership, clinical acumen, scholarly understand- 
ing, unpretentious modesty, and infectious good will and gen- 
tleness, this yearbook is dedicated. 




H. Houston Merritt, 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 

Vice President in Charge of 

Medical Affairs. 



Aura E. Severinghaus, 
Associate Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 



M 





s^L 




I iw ml 



Calvin H. Plimpton, 
Assistant Dean. 



Melvin D. Yahr, 
Assistant Dean. 



Admini strati on 



Mrs. Bodine 
Secretary to Dr. Severinghaus. 







— rrrrrt ^ 



Mrs. Eileen H. Daly, 
Assistant to the Registrar. 





/ 



Stearly Ailing 

Montclair, N. J. 
A. B., Wellesley, 1956 

Mary Fletcher Hosp, 
Burlington, Vt. 
Rotating General 




Richard Arnold Anderson 

Greenwich. Conn. 
A. B.. Wesleyan, 1956 

Mary Fletcher Hosp. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Rotating General 




Richard Dawson Anderson 

Birmingham. Ala. 
A. B.. Birmingham Southern. 
1956 

Charity Hospital 
New Orleans, La. 
Rotating General 



Stanley H. Appel 

Andover. Mass. 
A. B., Harvard, 1954 

Massachusetts Gen. Hosp. 
Boston, Mass. 
Straight Medicine 



Barry Maurice Beller 

Mahopac. N. Y. 
A. B.. Columbia. 1956 

U. oj Chicago Clinics 
Chicago, 111. 
Rotating General 





Jesse Arthur Blumenthal 

Brooklyn. N.Y. 
A. B.. Columbia. 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Surgery 







Edward B. Bradley 

Utica, N.Y. 
A. B.. Hamilton. 1956 

Syracuse Med. Center 
Syracuse : New York 
Straight Medicine 



Peter Braun 

Bridgeport. Conn. 
B. S., Yale, 1956 

Boston City Hosp. {Harvard) 
Boston, Mass. 
Straight Medicine 



William Harry Brownlee 

Charlotte, N. C. 
B. S., Davidson. 1956 

Roosevelt Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 



Desmond Callan 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B.. Columbia. 1950 
Montejiore Hosp. 

New York City. N.Y. 

Mixed 




George Peter Canellos 

East Boston, Mass. 
A.B.. Harvard. 1956 

Massachusetts Gen. Hosp. 
Boston, Mass. 
Straight Surgery- 




Richard Allen Chase 

South Orange, N. J. 
A. B., U. of Chicago, 1952 

Grace-New Haven Comm. 

Hosp. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Straight Medicine 





Julian Joseph Clark 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 
A. B.. Princeton, 1956 

Montejiore Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 



Martin Frank Choy 

Jersey City. N. J. 
A. B., Yale. 1956 

San Fransisco, Hosp. 
San Francisco. Calif. 
Mixed 





Rita W. Clark 

Brooklyn. New \ ork 
B. S., Brooklyn, 1956 

Montejiore Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed 



Richard Baker Clutz 

St. Davids. Pa. 
A. B.. Princeton. 1956 

Roosevelt Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed 





Thomas Franklin Coats 

Lexington. Kv. 
A. B.. Kentucky. 1952 

Roosevelt Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed 



Edward Lyman Coffey 

Westfield. N.J. 
A. B.. Princeton. 1956 

Presbyterian Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Surgery 




12 




Peter Jacob Cohen 
New York City, N. Y. 

A.B.. Princeton. 1956 
11. oj California Hasp. 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Straight Medicine 



Michael Irwin Cohen 
New York City. N. Y. 

A. B.. Columbia. 1956 

1/arv Imogene Bassell Hosp. 
Cooperstown. N. Y. 
Rotating General 





Dean Winfred Cummings 

Plains. Mont. 
A. B.. Montana State. 1952 

Los Angeles County Hosp. 
Los Angeles. Calif. 
Rotating General 



Henry F. Dawes 

Englewood. N. J. 
A. B.. Princeton. 1956 

Roosevelt Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed 





Leonard Gainsworth 
Dennick. Jr. 
Hamburg. N.Y. 
A.B., Colgate. 1956 

Syracuse Med. Center 
Syracuse, New York 
Straight Medicine 




p #wr,**\ ! 



Joseph Leroy Denner 

Alva. Okla. 
A. B.. Westminster. 1953 

Methodist Hosp. 
Brooklyn. New York 
Rotating General 




13 




Richard Arthur Doherty 

Newport. Me. 
A. B.. Bowdoin, 1954 

Beth Israel Hosp. 
Boston. Mass. 
Straight Medicine 



Ellen Marie Dolganos 

Jersey City. N. J. 
A. B., Vassar, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Pediatrics 



Arthur Robert DeSimone 

Glendale. N. Y. 
B. S., Manhattan, 1956 

Georgetown U. Hosp. 
District of Columbia 
Straight Medicine 





James Lewis Downey 

Darien. Conn. 
A. B., Yale, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp. 1st Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Medecine 






George B. Doyle 

Worcester. Mass. 
A. B.. Harvard, 1955 

Hartford Hosp. 
Hartford. Conn. 
Rotating General 



Peter B. Dunne 

Washington. D. C. 
A. B.. Harvard. 1955 

Bellevue Hosp., 3rd Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 

Straight Medicine 



14 



Grace Gene Eddison 

Riverdale, N. Y. 
A. B.. Wellesley, 1949 

Bellevue Hosp.. \st Div. 
New York City. N. V. 
-Mixed Medicine 



Norbert August Ehrmann 

Englewood, N.J. 
A. B., Princeton. 1953 

Mary Imogene Bassetl Hosp. 
Cooperstown, New York 
Rotating General 






Robert Newcomb En 

Katonah, N. Y. 
A. B., Dartmouth, 1956 

U. of Minnesota Hosp. 
Minneapolis. Minn. 
Straight Medicine 



ide 





Horacio Fabrega, Jr. 

Miami, Fla. 
A. B.. Pennsylvania, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed Medicine 



George Norman Forker 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 
A. B.. Yale, 1956 

Grace-New Haven Comm. 

Hosp. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Straight Surgery 



Stanley Arthur Forwand 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Union, 1956 
New England Center 

Boston, Mass. 

Straight Medicine 




15 




John Marcena Glezen 

Cortland, N. Y. 
A. B., Hamilton, 1956 

Syracuse Med. Center 
Syracuse, New York 
Straight Medicine 




Walter Henry Glinsmann 

Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
A. B., Columbia, 1956 

The New York Hasp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 




Stephen Edward Goldfinger 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Princeton, 1956 
Massachusetts Gen. Hosp. 

Boston, Mass. 

Straight Medicine 




Gregory James Heimarck 

New York City, N. Y. 
A. B., St. Olaf, 1956 

Mary Imogene Basset! Hosp. 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Rotating General 



Kenneth Charles Hanson 

Watertown, S. D. 
A. B., St. Olaf, 1956 

Charity Hosp. 
New Orleans, La. 
Rotating General 




Stanley Samuel Heller 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Yale, 1956 
Mount Sinai Hosp. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Rotating General 




16 





Evan Manuel Hersh 
New York City. N. Y. 

B. S., C.C.N.Y., 1956 
5/. Lukes Hosp. 

New York City. N. Y. 

Mixed Medicine 



William Ray Hicks 

New York City, N. Y. 
A. B.. Princeton. 1956 

U. of Chicago Clinics 
Chicago, 111. 
Rotating General 




Joshua Hollander 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B.. Columbia, 1956 
Vanderbilt U. Hosp. 

Nashville. Tenn. 

Straight Medicine 



Douglas Holsclaw, Jr. 

Tucson. Ariz. 
A. B., Arizona. 1956 

U. of Chicago Clinics 
Chicago, 111. 
Rotating General 




Frederick Gallatin Hoppin, Jr. 

New York City. N. Y. 
A. B., Harvard, 1956 

Stanford Center (Palo Alto) 
Palo Alto, Calif. 
Straight Medicine 





Jr. 



17 



Edward Lee Howes 

Dobbs Ferry. N. Y. 
A. B., Yale, 1956 

Grace-New Haven Comm 

Hosp. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Straight Surgery 





Matthew Joel Janin 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Columbia, 1956 
U. of California Hosp. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Straight Medicine 




Kendal Kent Kane 

Dover, Ohio 
A. B.. Princeton. 1955 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Surgery 



John Richard Johnson 

Quaker City, Ohio 
B.S., Ohio, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Surgery 



Priscilla M. N. Kao 

Singapore, Malaya 
A. B., Pennsylvania, 1956 

Pennsylvania Hosp. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rotating General 





Roland Gilbert Kallen 

Newark, N.J. 
A. B., Amherst, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp. 3rd Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Medicine 



Roger Stuart Kaufman 

Monroe. N. Y. 
A. B., Princeton, 1956 

Pennsylvania Hosp. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
Rotating General 





Howard Irving Keller 

Plainfield. N. J. 
A. B.. Princeton, 1956 

Med. College of Virginia 
Richmond. Virginia 
Rotating General 




Donald Latham King 

Pasadena. Calif. 
A.B., Stanford. 1956 

U. S. Air Force 
Rotating General 




Herbert Alan Klein 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 
A. B., Columbia, 1956 

Monlefiore Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 



Alan Francis Korhammer 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
A.B., Princeton, 1956 

U. of Washington Hosp. 
Seattle, Washington 
Rotating, Med. Major 



Arnold Joseph Kroll 

Miami Beach. Fla. 
A. B., Princeton. 1956 

Beth Israel Hosp. 
Boston. Mass. 
Straight Medicine 






Peter Paul Kronfeld 

Wilmette. 111. 
A. B., Wesleyan, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp, 1st Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed Medicine 



19 




Charles Nelson Leach, Jr. 

Newfane, Vermont 
A. B., Amherst, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp., 2nd Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 




Neil Murdo MacLean 

Bryan, Conn. 
A. B., Hamilton. 1956 

Mary Hitchcock Mem. Hosp. 
Hanover, N. H. 
Rotating General 



Laurus Waldemar Lehwalder 

Butte. Montana 
B. S., Oregon State, 1952 

Presbyterian Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 



James Don MacLowry 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Yale, 1956 

Los Angeles Charity Hosp. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rotating General 




Arthur Joseph Lennon 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B.. Fordham, 1956 
St. Lukes Hosp. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Mixed Surgery 






20 



Adolph T. Marubbio, Jr. 

Brooklyn, New York 
A. B.. New York University, 

1956 

Los Angeles County Hosp. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Rotating General 




Herbert J. Marx 

St. Albans. N.Y. 
B. E. E. Rensselaer Polytechnic. 

1954 

Presbyterian Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 




Sandra Louise Mogil 
New York City. N. Y. 

A. B.. Barnard. 1956 
Beth Israel Hosp. 

Boston. Mass. 

Straight Medicine 




Lester Barry Mayers 
New York City. N. Y. 

A. B.. Wisconsin,' 1956 
Bellevue Hosp.. 1st Div. 

New York City, N.Y. 

Straight Medicine 



Saul Victor Moroff 

New York City. N. Y. 
A. B.. Yale. 1956 

Bronx Mun. Hosp. Center 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 





Richard Scott Milligan 

Cincinnati. Ohio 
A. B., Kenyon, 1956 

Santa Clara Hosp. 
San Jose, Calif. 
Rotating General 



Alfred Joel Nadel 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Union, 1956 

Letter man Army Hosp. 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Rotating General 




fm 



21 




Michael Kenneth Nelson 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
A. B., Columbia, 1956 

U. of Virginia Hosp. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Straight Surgery 




t :* S 



■ 

[ 



\ / 



Mary Beatrice Nold 

Oakland, Calif. 
A. B., Northwestern, 1946: 
M. A.. Mills. 1948: B. L. S.. 

fornia, 1951 

U. of Minnesota Hosp. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Straight Pediatrics 



Cali 




Robert George Neuhardt 
New York City, N. Y. 

B. S., Yale, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp., 3rd Div. 

New York City, N.Y. 

Straight Pediatrics 



Harvey Ronald Nova 

New York City, N. Y. 
A. B., Brooklyn, 1956 

St. Vincents Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Surgery 





Ted Maurice Nicklaus 

Amarillo. Texas 
A. B., Yale. 1956 

U. of Utah Hosp. 
Utah 
Straight Medicine 



Joost Joe Oppenheim 

New York City, N. Y. 
A. B., Columbia, 1956 

King County Hosp. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Rotating General 




22 





Stanley Robert Palombo 
Brooklyn. New \ork 

A. B., Harvard, 1955 
U. of California Hosp. 

San Francisco. California 

Straight Medicine 



Ronald Chester Picoff 

Brooklyn. X. Y. 
A. B.. Columbia, 1956 

Mary Fletcher Hosp. 
Burlington. Vt. 
Rotating General 




Audrey Shields Penn 

New York City, N. Y. 
A. B., Swarthmore, 1956 

Bronx Mun. Hosp. Center 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 




Paulding Phelps 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. B., Haverford, 1955 

Philadelphia Gen. Hosp. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rotating General 



Jonathan Henry Pincus 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
A. B., Amherst, 1956 

Kings County Hosp. 
Brooklyn, New York 
Straight Medicine 





Alan Charles Raine 

Kew Gardens, N. Y. 
A. B.. Queens, 1955 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 



23 





Richard Ravel 

Clearwater. Fla. 
A. B., Harvard, 1955 

Jackson Memorial Hosp. 
Miami. Florida 
Rotating General 



Jay Howard Robbins 

Woodmere, N. Y. 
A. B., Harvard, 1956 

Mount Sinai Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Rotating General 




Herbert Faulkner Reilly, Jr. 

Forest Hills. N. Y. 
A. B.. Princeton. 1956 

Mary Fletcher Hosp. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Rotating General 




Ernest Carter Richards 

Rye. New York 
A. B., Yale, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed 



Theodore Presley Roman 

Rosholt. S. D. 
A. B., Dakota Wesleyan. 1956 

Presbyterian Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Straight Surgerv 




24 



■■ 





Ora M. Rosen 
New York City, N. Y. 

A.B.. Barnard, 1956 

Bronx Mun. Hosp. Center 

New York City, N. Y. 

Straight Medicine 



John Richard Sachs 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 
B. S., Manhattan, 1956 

Norlh Carolina Mem. Hosp. 
Chapel Hills. N. C. 
Straight Medicine 




Christopher V. Rowland, Jr. 

Reedsville, Pa. 
A. B.. Princeton, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp. 4/A Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 




Charles Monroe Rucker 

Flagstaff. Ariz. 
B. S., Arizona, 1956 

U. of Chicago Clinics 
Chicago. 111. 
Rotating General 



Wiliam Harry Salot 

Mt. Clemens, Mich. 
A. B.. Amherst. 1956 

Harper Hosp. 
Detroit. Mich. 
Rotating General 




25 



Stewart Marvin Scham 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
A. B.. New York University. 

1956 

U. of Chicago Clinics 
Chicago, Illinois 
Rotating General 





Dexter S. Y. Seto 

Honolulu, Hawaii 
A. B.. Kenyon, 1956 

Albany Hosp. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Rotating General 




Frederic DeGraw Schuh 

Teaneck, N. J. 
B. S., Trinity, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Surgery 




Elias Schwartz 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 
A. B., Columbia, 1956 

Montejiore Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 




Lloyd DuBois Smith. Jr. 

Oakdale. Calif. 
A. B.. California. 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City. N. Y. 
Mixed Surgery 



26 




Thomas Graves Smith, Jr. 

LaGrange. Ga. 
B. A.. Oxford, 1956 

Bronx Mun. Hosp. Center 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 



Richard Stanton Smith 

Laconia. N. H. 
A. B.. Wesleyan, 1956 

Bellevue Hosp., 2nd Div. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Medicine 






Sheila Horn Solomon 
Xew York City, N, Y. 

B. S., McGill. 1953 
Royal Victoria Hosp. 

Montreal, Canada 

Rotating General 



George Richard Stanley 

Lawton. Okla. 
B. S., Oklahoma, 1956 

Letterman Army Hosp. 
San Francisco, Calif. 
Rotating General 



Martin Lawrence Sorger 

Newark. N. J. 
A. B., Hamilton, 1956 

Presbyterian Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Straight Surgery 




27 





John Michael Suarez 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Columbia. 1956 

Stanford Center {Palo Alto) 

Palo Alto, Calif. 

Straight Medicine 



George Stassa 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B., Columbia. 1956 

Bronx Mun. Hosp. Center 

New York City, N. Y. 

Straight Medicine 




Neil Williams Swinton, Jr. 

Waban. Mass. 
A. B.. Haverford, 1956 

St. Lukes Hosp. 
New York City, N. Y. 
Mixed 




William R. Taylor 

Leominster, Mass. 

B. S., Worcester Polytechnic 

1955 

Pennsylvania Hosp. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 
Rotating General 



William Edward Temple 

Ridgewood. N. J. 
A. B.. Columbia, 1956 

U. of Chicago Clinics 
Chicago, Illinois 
Rotating General 





Robert James Touloukian 
New York City, N. Y. 

A. B.. Columbia. 1956 
Bellevue Hosp.. 1st Div. 

New York City. N. Y. 

Mixed Surgery 



28 




Allan Stuart Troupin 
New York Citv. N. Y. 

A. B.. Columbia.' 1956 
Syracuse Med. Center 

Syracuse. N. \ . 

Straight Medicine 




Rosalind Hilsen Troupin 
New ^ ork City. N.Y. 

B. S.. C. C. N. Y.. 1956 
Syracuse Med. Center 

Syracuse. N. Y. 

Mixed 





Renee D 


ede 




R 


enee's death was 


a genu- 1 


ine 


source of g 


rief 


to all 1 


will 


knew and 


loved her. 1 


We 


shall alwavs 


remember 1 


her 


courage. 
















Thomas Lowry Trunnel 

Kirksville. Mo. 

U. of Wisconsin Hosp. 
Madison. Wisconsin 
Mixed Medicine 




William Powell Urschel 
Bowling Green. Ohio 

A. B.. Princeton. 1956 
Naval Hosp. 

Bethesda, Maryland 

Rotating General 



Bernard Weiss 
Forest Hills. N. Y. 

A. B., Columbia. 1956 
Presbyterian Hosp. 

New York City, N. Y. 

Straight Medicine 





29 



David Emery Wolfe 

Seattle. Washington 
A. K, Columbia. 1956 

Neurological Diseases & 

Blindness, A . /. H. 
Bethesda. Md. 
Research 



if 1 



Left: WILFRED M. COPEN- 
HAVER, PROFESSOR OF 
ANATOMY. No matter how 
you slice it, it's still a teeeshew. 
Right: DOROTHY D. JOHN- 
SON. ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF ANATOMY. Dailee 
Bailey — else you failee. 





Left: GEORGE D. PAPPAS, 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF ANATOMY. Who's an 
artifact? Right; GEORGE K. 
SMELSER, PROFESSOR 
OF ANATOMY. Good Lord! 
It's looking up at me. 




In September, 1956, one hundred and twenty incorruptibly dedicated graduates 
of the best colleges of our nation gathered in Washington Heights. With unde- 
viating integrity and perseverence, they immediately assumed the responsibility 
that had been foremost in their minds: to search out the best bars, flicks, poolrooms, 
and stickball sites in the neighborhood. ' They also enrolled in the local medical 
school, for it had been rumored that it was a fun institution, one with all kinds 



WILLIAM M. ROGERS, AS- 
SISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
ANATOMY. $50,000 for a 
tweeter? 



GABRIEL C. GODMAN, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. But Kerouak ain't 
hep to chondroitin sulfate. 



FREDERICK J. AGATE, AS- 
SISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
.ANATOMY, "ashes to ashes" 



f 



r- 






Below: MALCOLM B. CARPENTER, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. My 
desk is a lot neater since we got rid of that 
Barany chair. 



Above: CHARLES R. NOBACK, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF ANATOMY. There was this lion in the zoo, see . . . 
Below: CHARLES A. ELY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
ANATOMY. Spoon-fed jejunum? 











Above, left: EMANUEL B. KAPLAN, ASSO- 
CIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF ANAT- 
OMY. You call that a finger? You should 
see my model. 

Above: HERBERT 0. ELFTMAN, ASSOCI- 
ATE PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY. I know 
my structure, but there's this function bus- 
iness. 

Above, right: MELVIN L. MOSS, ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY ... and 
we'll call this one the palatino-vaginal canal. 

Below, left: OTTHEINRICH HASE, IN- 
STRUCTOR IN ANATOMY. Never lost a 
patient this way. 

Below: It's all in Spinoza, pal. 
Below, right: Never lower . . . 






32 






Above: DAVID SHEMIN, PROFES 
SOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

There's nothing wrong with my bile, 
buddy. Below: DAVID SPRIN 
SON, PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEM 
ISTRY. Cogito ergo sum . . . c 
ito. 



Above: DAVID RITTENBERG, PRO- 
FESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER. This younger 
generation doesn't know a biochemist 
from an' enzyme. Below: ERWIN 
CHARGAFF, PROFESSOR OF BIO- 
CHEMISTRY^ You just lop off the 
myelin and it's all sphing . . . 






Above: KARL MEYER, PROFES- 
SOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. With 
a little bit of luck . . . Below: 
DAVID NACHMANSOHN, PRO- 
FESSOR OF NEUROLOGY. 
Excuse me; I'm a bit nervous today. 






Not by bread alone. 




33 





SAMUEL GRAFF, PROFESSOR 
OF BIOCHEMISTRY. Now there's 
a reprint for you, "Tropic of . . . 
hmm". 



HEINRICH B. WAELSCH. PRO- 
FESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
Blunders are bad, but inborn errors 
are inexcusable. 




STEPHEN ZAMENHOF, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
Gene, hell, I can't even find the 
nucleus. 




ZACHARIS DISCHE, PROFES- 
SOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. I don't 
see what's so funny about this vit- 
reous . 




BARBARA W. LOW, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 
Biochemistry can take the most pecul-x 
iar turns. 



IRWIN B. WILSON, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF BIOCHEMISTRY. When yon get blood 
entropy levels, let me know. 



SEYMOUR LIEBERMAN, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. I've got a spe- 
ail here in 3 rooms and a bath. 





34 





PARITHYCHERY SRIMVASAN. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
BIOCHEMISTRY. Quick Weiss, 
retract the article. 



ALVIN I. KRASNA. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF BIOCHEM- 
ISTRY. I still can't get this damn 
coffee to perk right. 




Some did 









-:> 



■4 



Left : Don't push me, Braun ; if they 
charged enough tuition, they'd get a 
better batch of students. Right; Gosh, 
Charlie, she's better with feathers than 
balloons. 




Some didn't. 






35 





Left: MAGNUS I. GREGERSEN, JOHN C. 
DALTON PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. 
Forget about the color son; does it look like 
Evans to you? Above: WILLIAM L. NAS- 
TUK, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHY- 
SIOLOGY. You walk by Bard Hall every 
day? Right: WALTER S. ROOT, PROFES- 
SOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. Tell the students 
what happened when you insulted the phy- 
siologist, Charlie. 







WILLIAM W. WALCOTT, ASSOCI- 
ATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOL- 
OGY. It's just another manuscript for 
the Journal of Small Laboratory ani- 
mals. 



LOUIS J. CIZEK, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. Let me 
give it to you this way ; jirea ain't 
as bad as cyanide. 



MERO NOCENTI, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY. I told 
them that yesterday. I'll have to con- 
tradict it today. 







Above, left: SHU CHIEN, ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOL- 
OGY. I don't know: Root drew it in> 
1936, and they're still trying to figure 
it out. Above: Not the Physiology lab. 
Left: Something new for you to break. 
Right: Water is the image of the 
ungraspable phantom of life; and this 
is the key to it all. 




36 




t±Y 



Stop smiling Nicola. If Bard wants 
to cail it a textbook of physiology 
we've got to list it that way. 




Things got pretty basic. 





Above, left: Some got desperate. 
Above : As the world turned upside 
down. Above, right: Others took a 
more leisurely view. 




Who cut the fermoral artery'? 






37 




Front Row: Philip Briska. Robert M. Burd, Serber, Murray Epstein, Alan D. Manzler. Robert Brown, Albert Assali, Elizabeth 
McSherry, Bruce Nelson. Top Row: George S. Barell, Alfred Scherzer. William J. Aronson, Charles Steinman. Jerome Shupack. 
William P. Arend, Bernard Snyder, James D. Parker, Mark H. Pohlman. Jacob D. Lindy. Joel S. Hoffman, James C. Reynolds. 



First Year 



Front Row. Rolf F. Barth, Marc J. Taylor, Daniel M. Musher, Stephen Rittenberg, Alan N. Schechter, Stephen A. Feig, Jerry A. 
Wiser, John Noble, III. Top Row: Lloyd Kamin, Lades, Howard Wolfinger, David E. Pleasure. Martin Rosenblatt. Michael G. 
Ehrlich, Jonathan Serxner, Thomas V. Long II, Davidson, Gerald Mackler. Reifsnyder. 



) 



B 



^ a» ft <£ r; n -?* ^ 

\ ' \i \ | J \ r f. I j 



i 





9$^9ftp> 




Front Row: Frederick Sachs, Avron Maletzky, David Schwartz, Daniel D. Morgan, David L. Scheiner. 2nd Row: Eugene Zwei- 
bach, John T. Murphy. Miriam B. Dushman, Geraldine Poppa, Jeanette C. Rodman, Eva Julia Neer, Susan M. Deakins, Carmen 
I. Ortiz. M. Lanier Anderson. Philip R. Larsen, George L. Paris. Top Row: Michaelson, Robert Schaefer, Martin D. Feldman, 
Julian C. Zener. Richard L. Banner, Michael Rosenbaum, Joel W. Saks, Richard D. Perlman. Peter F. Muehlbauer, Peter Todd 
Naiman, Dean Scott Wood, Edwin G. Fischer, Robert Dante Coli. 



Front Row: Richard A. Rudders, Leonard Steinfeld, Mark E. Kahn, Samuel 0. Essandoh, Joel Mark Rein, Eli Wainstein, Frede- 
rick Tiley, Clyde W. Chun, Stephen Schonberg. Top Row: John Simmons, Charles V. Ford, Wayne D. Cannon, Jr., Dudley A. 
Ferrari. R. Heissenbuttal, George S. Mauerman, Roger David Cohen. Robert B. Page, Martin P. Geller, John G. Kauderer, Charles 
M. Smith. Richard A. Ryder, Louis E. Dickinson. 




9 9$fyj&|*fl>f& 









mi 








Above, left: . . . and chuck roast is 59c a pound. Above, right: "Gross" session. Below, left: 
HARRY P. SMITH, FRANCIS DELAFIELD, PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY. You see, I 
really don't have a mechanical stage; in lact. it doesn't even have lenses. Below right: 
WELLINGTON B. STEWART, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY. Smith says: 
Turn in your smudge sticks! 





Left: GEORGE P. VENNART, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY. Sure this 
course stinks. That's the way we designed it. 
Below, left: Peep show! Below, right: FRED 
V. LUCAS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
PATHOLOGY. Bradley calls this pyeloneph- 
ritis? 





Above: ABNER fiOLF. PROFESSOR OF NEU- 
ROPATHOLOGY. Put me down for 67-no 68. 
Aboie, right: Neuropath lab instructors. Above. 
far right: That's the best drawing you made all 
year, but why did you draw that slide? Right: 
Neuropath lab. 




of facilities for jolly good diversions from life's more stressful situations. It 
seemed to be a respectable enough club besides, as judged by all the Mercedes, 
Cadillacs, and Royces parked around it. True, an occasional wizened old man 
might pull up on a rusty bicycle clinging to a lunch bag or an old penny, but with 
a title like "chief resident" he could be little more than a glorified custodian. 
And there were three tennis courts in the back, in addition to nine hole golf 
course in the planning stage. 

The club jacket I white with blue inkstain over the lapel I was bought in dupli- 
cate and triplicate by all hundred and twenty. Then came indoctrination classes. 
One was called gross anatomy and featured 30 cadavers and 6 instructors. They 
were easy to tell apart because the latter sometimes assumed a vertical position. 
Also, there were kicks to be had in microanatomy: some initiates gripped their 
colored pencils to the breaking point during one memorable, fiery half-time speech. 
Physiology offered a quieter, "inner" serenity and joy. All developed a vital 
capacity for smoking drums to the rhythm of the Evan's Blues. Squash lessons 
were given by a renowned doubles team: Carpenter and Noback. There were also 
biochemistry and statistics, with enzymes in one and beads in the other. Towards 



No. we haven't seen Lucas. 



1^. ^ •> 





They sent us a list. 






RAY E. TRUSSELL. JOSEPH R. DeLAMAR 
PROFESSOR OF ADMINISTRATIVE MEDI- 
CINE. Be healthy in public. 



LEONARD J. GOLDWATER. PROFESSOR OF 
OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE. I have this let- 
ter from the National Boards . . . 




JOHN W. FERTIG. PROFESSOR 
OF BIOSTATISTICS. Can you 
hear me back there? 





Above: GEORGE L. SAIGER. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
EPIDEMIOLOGY ... and that's 
a hell of a lot of egg creams. 
Below: ROGER W. WILLIAMS. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY. What 
has 15 legs, 3 hooks and flies? 



HAROLD W. BROWN, PROFESSOR OF PAR- 
ASITOLOGY". Don't you ever call me that again. 




42 












The boys took to the jungle in a flight from New York. Bottom: The Ascaris affair. 




Ht' 














BH 


i 


H ^K»— ^ 




Above: HARRY M. ROSE, JOHN E. BORNE, PRO- 
FESSOR OF MEDICAL AND SURGICAL 
RESEARCH. To summarize, il I may . . , Below: 
BEATRICE C. SEEGAL, PROFESSOR OF MICRO- 
BIOLOGY. . . . and this little piggy won't wee wee 
well. 



Above: ELVIN A. KABAT, PROFESSOR OF MICRO- 
BIOLOGY. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis; let's ask 
it. Below: First blood. 





BERNARD F. ERLANGER, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF MICRO- 
BIOLOGY. What do we do now? 
The strain is sensitive to agar. 



COUNCILMAN MORGAN, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF MICRO 
BIOLOGY. . . . And I can even see 
Councilman bodies. 



CALDERON HOWE. ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOL- 
OGY. . . . and all the kids have 
"the virus" too. 






44 




SAM M. BEISER. ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY. Gen- 
tlemen . . . complement is fixed. 





JM».jM&-r 



Left: STUART W. TANENBAUM, 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
MICROBIOLOGY. Guess what I've 
grown out ol aqua regia? Above: The 
coldest place on Washington Heights. 




Below: Hypersensitivity was mani- 
fest. 




wrwRY H CURTIS5, E.IOCM GHtfcw . 

HOR*TWWO(MH.CY. EUHU T HEDGES, 
HENRY W PORTER. A. JUOSON RAND. 

JOHN SNOWDEN. SIOMEY ■ WORTH. 
STUDENTS 

OP TVS 

.-OULCCE OF RHV1ICIAM AMD tUROEONi. 

iiitd or i'K»TILir>Tl*i. i>i*i:a** 

umi. nriivme in nu 

, i HI IC HOSPITALS Of NEWVOBK. 

TMI« TABLKT 

H CHXCTT.D BY TUB rACULTV, 

THAT TKII MXUOllV or THKbK 
MARTYRS OfHlM».MT\ 

MO NOT DIE. 

IM) THAT TAL' Clt T MV THMII rYAMPLC, 

TI11T bHADVATU Or Till 1(111 III 

MYH IIIIITAir TO IIA/VHII l.IVS 

i-> TiiK rmroMuitcE «r5" 
PHOFESSIONA1. Ill TV. 




Above; Staph enterotoxin-cheap ! 




45 





HARRY B. VAN DYKE, DAVID HOSACK, PRO- 
FESSOR OF PHARMACOLOGY. Of course it's 
true-true related. 



SHIH-CHUN WANG. PROFESSOR OF 
PHARMACOLOGY. Who else ever found 
a vomit center? 



tne end of their first year, the new members of this old club were so euphoric that 
they produced a show. Its biggest number took place backstage when Bill Hicks 
floated in a keg of beer, and vice versa. 

In June, the hundred and twenty disbanded temporarily. In addition to suc- 
cessfully accomplishing their preliminary club rituals, many had partaken of the 
local color. Nine remained behind to continue their tropical gardening. Four 
had retired permanent seats at the Uptown Theater. And one industrious chap 
completed an exhausting studv of the habits of the nocturnal streetwalkers of the 
neighborhood. He found that each one used all six legs and both antannae as it 
migrated from apartment house to apartment house. 

The group reconvened in the fall of 1957. Many had acquired wives in the 
interim, but their loyalty to the club remained. Activities were numerous. Drawing 
classes were quite successful despite the rigorous imposition of three meetngs per 
week. Polymorphic mononuclear leukocytes were popular subject matter, but fib- 
rocytes ranked a close second. An intriguing adventure for the more esoteric was 
provided by microbiology, which stimulated a lively interest in new and diverse 
cultures. Others attended meetings of the local debating society on Tuesday after- 
noons, but were disturbed by topics that they considered to be "sick" or "patholog- 
ical"'. 

A certain aura of neighborhood elegance was heralded by Izzy's decision to 
enter the Diner's Club plan. Remy's and the A. B. & G. followed in short order. 

At about this time, the Friendly Shop experienced a run on scotch tape engend- 
ered by a challenging new pastime. "Pinworm Egg'". The sport had its earthier 
variations as well, including "Giardia Lamblia'" and "Entamoeba Coli". Despite 
a certain uniqueness to the game, which was to ultimately prevent it from reaching 
mass appeal proportions, minor trends of activity were noted on the \ ale and 
Princeton campuses. I It still survives among the folkways of the latter, albeit 
hybridized into the ceremonial "Gotcha Plus"'. I 

In the meantime, forms were being readied for completion by each member 



46 





WILBUR H. SAWYER. ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF PHARMACOLOGY. Blast off! 



Good Lord — it's measuring my blood pressure! 




FREDERICK G. HOFMANN. ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF PHARMACOLOGY. I call this 
talk "Digitalis-Repercussions With a View To- 
ward the Kidney". 



HERBERT J. BARTELSTONE. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF PHARMACOLOGY. It's rotten 
as a cathartic, but what a placebo effect! 



Slops headache three ways. 





47 



Second Year 



iHi^i 





Front Row, left to right: Joel Weinstein, Norbert Hirschhorn, Alton Steiner. Earl Fogelberg, Parke Gray, Jerome Rygorsky, Court- 
ney Brown, Donald Caton, Ganson Purcell, Lawrence Margolies. Second Row: Joel Karlinger, Anthony Oppenheimer, Barbara Flood, 
Timothy Smelzer, A. Bernard Ackerman, Marcia Buckley, James Valuska, Bovd Seidenberg. Khosrow Nasr, Howard Zeft, Fred 
Hurst. Third Row: Peter Wolf, David Patek, Robert Gellance, Solan Choo, Stanley Cohen, Peter Barlow, Myles Behrens, Paul 
Pease, Leonard Dauber, Stephen Silver, Michael Rappaport, Jacob Haft, William Klein, Paul Mosher. Back Row: John Brust, 
William Covey, James Vogel, Donald Burress, Spencer Sherman, Joel Kraut, Franz Stewart, Herman Frankel, Robert Herzberg, 
Howard Berman, Edward Coates, Eugene Schiff, Henry Solomon. Donald Bell. 



48 




Front Row, left to right: Donald Cohen, Richard Orahood, Irving Lerner, Salvatore Pagliaro, John Kovach, Peter Puchner, Steph- 
en Bazahler, Kennetli Berkes, Richard Brown. Second Row. Albert Casazza, Relton McCarroll, Robert Miller, Robert Pascal. Bar- 
bara Rosen, Sandra Grant. Mary Jeanne Kreek. Anne Gamble, Sherman Bull, John White, Gabriel Schwartz. Third Row: Robert 
Winslow. Forrest Weight. Harold Bruck. William Duncan, Andrew Franzone, Bernard Talbot, Glen Bell, Elihu Root, Timothy 
Schuster, Nicholas Romas, Peter Immordino, Barry Walker, Jonathan Levine. Back Row: Karl Waterson, Robert Waldbaum, Ian 
Nisonson, Peter Parry. Edward Hankin. Richard Ulin, Howard Dubin, William Lovejoy, Scott Murphy, Steve Flagg, Newell Augur, 
Jack Kelley. Arthur Geller, James Campbell. 



49 




Left: ROBERT F. LOEB, SAMUEL BARD PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICINE. But I thought you tested the urine! Above: 
Why don't you ask her what measles looks like?! 






FRANKLIN M. HANGER, JR., 
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. To 
hell with Freud, I say it's a liver 
with sticky globulins. 



I don't know why . . . Osier used to 
do it. 



GEORGE A. PERERA. PROFESSOR 
OF MEDICINE. So what if vour blood 
pressure is 300/250! 

DANA W. ATCHLEY. PROFESSOR 
EMERITUS OF CLINICAL MED- 
ICINE. Never mind which physical 
findings he had . . . tell me about the 
social history. 



YALE KNEELAND, JR.. PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. And just 
when did aldosterone levels become 
part of a routine hemogram? 



The word is micturate. 






STANLEY E. BRADLEY. PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. EXECUTIVE 
OFFICER. Come now. this must be 
somebody's patient. 





ALFRED GELLHORN. PROFESSOR 
OF MEDICINE. Cancer, schman- 





JOHN V. TAGGART, PROFESSOR 
OF MEDICINE. At a time like that . . . 
no film in the camera. 




ROBERT C. DARLING. PROFESSOR 
OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND 
REHABILITATION. Say, darling. 



JOSEPH C. TURNER. PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Turners 
syndrome . . . named for me? 



CHARLES RAGAN. PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL MEDICINE. The hell I 
have a Buffalo hump! 



Medicine is more fun than a barrel of 
monkeys! 



Did you know that Denner? 



Fiddle-dee-dee! ! ! 






5) 





Now, now Dave, don't be shy; 
speak to the students. 



HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH. 

CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICINE. Another chairman- 
ship? Why not? Yes, why not? 



FREDERICK R. BAILEY, CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF MEDI- 
CINE. Now, now; no one's a crock. 




Above, left: ALFRED P. FISHMAN, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. Stan wants to measure urine with it. 
Above, right: JOSEPH W. JAILER, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. No, we can't fix it Bob, 
but we can change your name to Roberta. 



Above, left: SIDNEY C. WERNER. ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Who's a solitary nodule? 
Above, right: CHARLES A. FLOOD. ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. You're supposed to record 
the stool guaiacs: not mount them. 






Above, left: DAVID SCHACHTER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Now, we multi- 
ply by the Schachter factor. Above: DANIEL L. LARSON. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MED- 
ICINE. What ever happened to FI? Above, right: PAUL A. MARKS, ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF MEDICINE. There was Chico. Harpo. Zeppo. Groucho. and . . . Beloiv. left: DONALD 
F. TAPLEY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Who spilled the T3? Below right: 
ELLIOTT F. OSSERMAN, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE. Bence-Jones couldn't 
treat grippe; why should I? 







KERMIT L. PINES. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. You say you can't get the 24 
hour urine up the stairs? 



CALVIN H. PLIMPTON, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. Bradley insisted on off-service 
notes. 



HELEN M. RANNEY. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. I wonder what his hemoglobin 
R is today? 







Above, left: HENRY ARANOW. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Aranow! ... not Arrowsmith! 
Above, right: FELIX E. DEMARTINI. ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Chacun a son gout. 



Above, left: JOHN H. LARAGH. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Sure aldosterone: what else 
could cause leukemia? Above, right: STUART W. COS- 
GRIFF, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDI- 
CINE. You may bleed a little . . . 






Above, left: ALBERT R. LAMB. JR.. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. 
Is this a medical school or a freak show? Above: Aspirin for pain, penicillin for fever; 
digitalis for heart trouble: vitamins for what ails vou: steroids for everything else. Above, 
right: RICHARD J. STOCK, INSTRUCTOR IN MEDICINE. This clinic practice is warping me. 
Below far left: Roared . . . Below, left: Bored. Below, right: You're wrong about those stocks. 
Below far right: I don't know, Cal, what do you want to do? 







ANDRE F. COURNAND, PRO- 
FESSOR OF MEDICINE. Come 
in, Mr. Morrow. 




,r-L_a^kft rvD 



DICKINSON W. RICHARDS, SAM- 
UEL W. LAMBERT PROFESSOR OF 
MEDICINE. I wonder what they use 
this for? 




M. IRENE FERRER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
MEDICINE and REJANE HAR- 
VEY, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL MEDICINE. Just 
a little stick. 



Left: MRS. TOWNSEND. Doesn't anybody want a case? Left: Her LMD said she didn't have a murmur. Right: MISS 

Right: The shark has pretty teeth, dear. KENNEDY. But you already did a pelvic this month. 





l3 










1m 

1 * 





PAUL WERMER, ASSOCIATE IN 
MEDICINE. ZoIlinger-EUison??! 




Left: The day he forgot the unknown 
slide. Below: In vino Veritas. Right: 
A mature approach to higher learning. 




54 




Just think of the Cheshire cat! 





Above: The Goldwater Group of 
August-September, 1959. Below: 
ARTHUR R. WERTHEIM, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF MEDI- 
CINE. Don't you think you might 
look at your patient? 




Above : The PH nurses were lovely, 
Below: DAVID SEEGAL, PROFES 
SOR OF MEDICINE. Life is short 
art long, opportunity fleeting, experi 
ence treacherous, judgment difficult 




IC NE WAT ' 



*h 



»s o 9 -9 



A AA AA 




Above: Goldwater, April-May, 1960. 
Below: Get the best out of your 
contemporaries. 





Below, left: We hillbillies deal from the top of the deck, son. 



Below: The in and the outs. 



1 




55 







H. HOUSTON MERRITT, PROFESSOR OF 
NEUROLOGY; EXECUTIVE OFFICER. THE 
BOSS. I'll just have to work a little harder. 



J. LAWRENCE POOL, PROFESSOR OF NEU- 
ROLOGICAL SURGERY. EXECUTIVE OFFI- 
CER. "Thanks to you. Dr. Pool!" It was easy, 
we just tied off the foramen magnum. 




Left: CARMINE T. 

VICALE, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL 
NEUROLOGY. THE 
COACH. I've seen this a 
thousand times. Right: 
PAUL F. A. HOEFER. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF NEUROLOGY. Gooot 
morning. 





Lett: SIDNEY CARTER. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL NEUROLO- 
GY. No, I did not discover 
little pills! Right: DANIEL 
SCIARRA. ASSOCIATE 

PROFESSOR OF NEUROL- 
OGY. What do you mean?!, 
"there's no weakness there'? 




56 




JOSEPH RANSOHOFF. ASSOCI- 
ATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY. 

Sure there's room lor a 5th case. 
We'll do her tonight. 



I 




kt 



i 



ROBERT A. FISHMAN. ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF NEUROL- 
OGY. His serum Mg is and he 
isn't shaking? What's his CSF rub- 
ber? 




JAMES F. HAMMILL. ASSIST- 
ANT PROFESSOR OF NEUROL- 
OGY. THE COLONEL. Thar she 
bleeds! Fill out the aneurysm 
forms ! 



wishing advancement in the club. These applications came out at intervals — 
every day or so — and were spiced with witty questions and entertaining dialogue. 
Nobody reallv minded the ink and graphite expense, for the delightful little games 
and puzzles were but testimonials to what kind of a fun place this really was. 
At the end of the second year, a highly amusing little gambit was held on 
what used to be the roof of Bard Hall. There was plenty of liquor and enough small 
bombs to keep everyone happy. Phone calls (from the docks. Palisades, and 
Yonkers I persuaded a token force of police and firemen to visit the affair, but 
their hostility rapidly vanished once they were introduced la bit forcibly, perhaps) 
to "Icarus" — a game no rooftop should be without. It should be noted that 
Lee Denner was awarded the "Two Year Promptness" medallion on this occasion. 



LEWIS P. ROWLAND. ASSISTANT PROFES- 
SOR OF NEUROLOGY. It must be fun to be 
a biochemist. 



WILLIAM AMOLS. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL NEUROLOGY. Dilantin, any- 




57 





Left: LAWRENCE C. KOLB, PROFESSOR OF 
PSYCHIATRY. EXECUTIVE OFFICER. What, 
me worry? Above: WILLIAM S. LANCFORD, 
PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY. Oedipus, 
schmoedipus, so long as he's happy. Below: 
PHILLIP POLATIN, ASSOCIATE PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY. And now 
I've discovered pseudo-schizophrenic neurosis. 






WILLIAM A. HORWITZ. PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL PSYCHI- 
ATRY. Just filing a few anecdotes. 



HILDE BRUCH, CLINICAL PRO- 
FESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY. A fat 
man is a jolly man? 




H. DONALD DUNTON, 
ASSISTANT CLINICAL 

PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIA- 
TRY. Right in the middle 
of all that company . . . 




58 





CARL T. NELSON. PROFESSOR OF DERMA- 
TOLOGY, EXECUTIVE OFFICER. Old White- 
head. 



J. LOWRY MILLER, ASSOCIATE CLINICAL 
PROFESSOR OF DERMATOLOGY. So this 
princess from Tahiti called me up. 




Above: ANTHONY N. DOMON- 
KOS, ASSISTANT CLINICAL 
PROFESSOR OF DERMATOL- 
OGY. A little x-ray never hurt any- 
body. Below: CHARLES F. POSf. 
INSTRUCTOR IN DERMATOL- 
OGY. . . . and if it's dry, wet it! 



V 


A K 


r \i 




i^R) .-*v 


**iP 


!*■■- 





Aboie: MARGARITA SILVA-SANTIAGO, 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF DERMATOL- 
OGY. Under the spreading Mvcelia. Beloiv: F. 
P. LOWENFISH, ASSOCIATE 'IN DERMATOL- 
OGY. You never can tell who might have it. 




Above: I'd walk a mile for a chan- 
cre. Below: L. SCHWEICH. ASSO- 
CIATE IN DERMATOLOGY. . . . 
and I say: It's discoid. 




59 




OBESITY - 




V 



Ginny strikes again! 






GEORGE H. HUMPHREYS II. VALENTINE MOTT PRO- 
FESSOR OF SURGERY. What do you mean? You never 
heard of Halstead?! 





RUDOLF N. SCHULLINGER, 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SUR- 
GERY. Death! Death lo the invad- 
ers! 



Left: RAFFAELE LAT- 
TES, PROFESSOR OF 
SURGERY. Well, I 
agree with Dr. Stout that 
this is lipohemangioendo- 
theliorhabdomyocarcinosar- 
coma with squamous met- 
aplasia. Right: VIRGIN- 
IA KNEELAND FRANZ. 
PROFESSOR OF SUR- 
GERY". I said: Cushman, 
you'll never get a breast 
out that way! But he 
wouldn't listen to me. 



ROBERT H. WYLIE, CLINICAL 
PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. 
Now Dr. Wylie, I have a patient 
with a perforated esophagus; what 
do I do next? 



W mm. 


I_ 






i 













CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN. 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL SUR- 
GERY. Keep that woman out of 
my 0. R. . . . 4-0 silk? What does 
she think I am — a merchant mar- 




60 




JOSE FERRER. ASSIST- 
ANT CLINICAL PRO- 
FESSOR OF SURGERY. 
Nothing like a quiet 
afternoon at Believue. 



NATHAN LANE, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF SURGERY. Are 
they kidding? Where's the rest of 
the stomach? 



GEORGE F. CRIKELAIR, ASSOC- 
IATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
SURGERY. We can close that 
cavern by swinging a flap. 



MILTON R. PORTER. 
ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINI- 
CAL SURGERY. 
Now, suppose this was 
the common bile duct. 






HENRY S. F. COOPER, ASSOCI- 
ATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF 
SURGERY'. Rudi, would you ever 
advocate primary gastrectomy fol- 
lowing perforation?!! 

THOMAS V. SANTULLI, ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLIN- 
ICAL SURGERY. What do you 
mean, you put the T-E fistula on 
a regular diet? 



HAROLD G. BARKER, AS- 
SOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. I'm 
still a little puzzled by some 
of the factors causing ascites 
in cirrhosis. 

ARTHUR H. BLAKEMORE. ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL SURGERY. No sir, I 
don't worry about bleeders until I can hear them. 



ROBERT H. E. ELLIOTT, JR.. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. Please 
Ray, get your head out of the light ; 
I can't see the recurrent nerve. 



EDWARD L. HOWES, ASSOCI. 
ATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
SURGERY. Big Ed. 




61 







ROBERT HIATT, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL SURGERY. Constipation? De- 
fine your terms! 







FERDINAND F. McALLISTER. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. So what 
can I do for you? I just finished 
a mitral commisurotomy and a fem- 
oral bypass. 



EDMUND N. GOODMAN. AS- 
SISTANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR 
OF SURGERY. Easy Ed. Good- 
man: I wonder how this will show 
on the EGG. 








Above, left: PHILIP D. WIEDEL, IN- 
STRUCTOR IN SURGERY. Wait un- 
til the boys at Bellevue hear about this 
one. Above: SHIVAJI B. BHONSLAY, 
INSTRUCTOR IN SURGERY. Let me 
tell you how / heparinize patients for 
the pump. Above, right: JOHN SCUD- 
DER. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL SURGERY. Well, get that 
blood cross matched! Lelt: CARL R. 
FEIND, INSTRUCTOR IN SUR- 
GERY. Well ma'am, this isn't exactly 
my field. Right: FREDERICK P. 
HERTER, INSTRUCTOR IN SUR- 
GERY. How about perfusing it? 



Lelt: JOHN PRUDDEN, INSTRUC- 
TOR IN SURGERY. I always use gen- 
erous incisions. Right: ARTHUR B. 
VOORHEES, INSTRUCTOR IN SUR- 
GERY. Blake, I think I had better 
keep my finger on the aorta. 



62 





1 jr A 




' )i 




& IrtJkii 




■ felfl 



*itd 



i 





JOHN K. LATTIMER. PROFESSOR OF UROLOGY. 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER. Which of you boys wants to 
write about this instrument? 



HANS H. ZINSSER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL UROLOGY. We'll ask you 
about Gram negative organisms. 




VCT? 



At last! 



Above: Dog days in surgery. 
Below: AL MARKOWITZ. 
ASSISTANT IN SURGERY. 
Yes you little devil, you're 
the one that bit me. 



W. GRAHAM KNOX, INSTRUC- 
TOR IN SURGERY. 





A session at Mother Luke's. 




63 






Left: HARRISON L. McLAUGHLIN, PROFES- 
SOR OF CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

Stimson taught you that? Above: ALAN 

Deforest smith, professor emeritus 

OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. Somebody has 
to do some teaching. Right: FRANK E. 
STINCHFIELD, PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPE- 
DIC SURGERY, EXECUTIVE OFFICER. You 
mean varus and valgus are. different? 

Left: LEONIDAS A. LANTZOUNIS, CLINICAL 
PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 
You can't be a scientist if you want to think of 
the patient. Below: MELVIN B. WATKINS, 
ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF OR- 
THOPEDIC SURGERY. For the life of me I 
can't see why this got better. Right: CHARLES 
A. L. BASSETT, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
ORTHOPEDIAC SURGERY. A few bone chips 
would have done jsut as well. 






Left: ALEXANDER GARCIA, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. What's a broken 
bone between friends. Right: BROWNIE: They never 
show up on time. 



Left: WILLIAM H. VON LACKUM, ASSISTANT CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. I've 
been framed. Right: CHARLES S. NEER II, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL ORTHOPEDIAC SURGERY. I 
came here to teach not to smile. 





64 





EMANUEL M. PAPPER, PROFESSOR OF 
ANESTHESIOLOGY. EXECUTIVE OFFICER. 
I would ask them about barbiturate anesthetic. 



VIRGINIA APGAR. PROFESSOR OF ANES- 
THESIOLOGY. No you can't have a ten! 





SHIH-HSUN NGAI. ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF ANESTHESIOL- 
OGY. Did you know you were cir- 
culating in Room C. 



FRANK MOYA, ASSOCIATE IN 
ANESTHESIOLOGY. Madame, 

chloroform has been in use for cen- 
turies. Just poohah. 



The presentation was made in the form of a mountain dew toast and the recipients 
acceptance remarks were truly touching. 

The third club year is the turning point, so it is written and echoed by all 
older members. For it is then that the initiates begin to share in the philanthropic 
and benevolent proceedings that are so important in justifying the existence of any 
club. 

The essence of this transition is membership privilege in one or more small 
clans or "clublets". each composed of a representative cross-section of the entire 
organization. Daily rites, called "Rounds" (in celebration of the Perfect Circle of 
Pure Reason I . are held by each clan. It is here that benevolence is exercised, 
philanthropv exemplarized. 

The foremost and perpetual endeavour of "Rounds" is veneration of the elders. 
No Round can start until at least one, in long white flowing gown, can preside. 
He is consulted in all decisions. He has experience. He is the leader of Rounds, 



65 





FRANZ ALTMANN, CLINICAL 
PROFESOR OF OTOLARYN- 
GOLOGY. . . . and it removes 
blackheads too. 





Left: EDMUND J. FOWLER, JR. 
PROFESSOR OF OTOLARYN- 
GOLOGY, EXECUTIVE OFFICER 
. . . And then we'll splice your 
sphenoid to the utricle. Above: 
MILOS BASER. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OTO- 
LARYNGOLOGY. How do you 
expect me to lecture about such rot- 
ten material? 




DANIEL C. BAKER. JR., CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF OTO- 
LARYNGOLOGY. One more mirror 
and we'll see alveoli! 



JULES WALTNER, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OTO- 
LARYNGOLOGY. Why not rum- 
mage around the attic? 



ROBERT M. HUI, ASSISTANT 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF OTO- 
LARYNGOLOGY. Well, it keeps the 
sweat from running down my face, for 
one thing. 



BELA MARQUIT, ASSISTANT CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR OF OTOLAR- 
YNGOLOGY. Lend me vour ears! 



E. B. BILCHICK, ASSOCIATE IN 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY. ... and I see 
circles in from of my eyes. 






66 




A. GERARD DEVOE, PROFESSOR 
OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, EXECU- 
TIVE OFFICER. You focus your lens 
and I'll focus -my lens. 




J. VINCENT FLACK, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OPH- 
THALMOLOGY. Here's mud in 
your eye. 




R. M. ELLSWORTH, ASSISTANT 
IN OPHTHALMOLOGY. Did yon 
drop a dime in the slot? 




FRANK PAYNE, ASSOCIATE IN 
OPHTHALMOLOGY. Temporal 
hemianopsia, yes. Divine hemianop- 
sia, no. 



to whom all remarks are addressed and from whom all utterances are recorded. 
Nobody's Reasoning could be more Perfectly Circular. On rare occasions, he gives 
gems I usually pearls I to younger members whom he favors. 

Individuals of intermediate stature guard the carefully transcribed proceedings 
of each clan. These impressive tomes, in chart form, are frequent points of depar- 
ture for lengthy dissertations on the practices and privileges of membership. It is 
at these moments that initiates are embued with the underlying Mystique, the 
whispered truths and unwritten tenets that will someday set them apart. It is here 
that basic values are promulgated, values codified long ago by King-Armstrong, 
Bodansky. Westergren, and others. 

Finally. Rounds provide new opportunities for initiation ceremonies. Some- 



67 





HATTIE E. ALEXANDER, PROFESSOR OF 
PEDIATRICS. Who did that lumbar puncture? 
Who counted the cells in that spinal fluid? Had 
he had experience with this previously? 

RUSTIN McINTOSH, REUBEN S. CAR- 
PENTIER PROFESSOR OF PEDIAT- 
RICS. . . . and how many teeth do you 
have? 

times the most venerated of the eldest, the chieftain of all tribes, visits Rounds 
in the traditional garb of the Silver Fox. It is to him that the sacrificial Presentation 
Ritual is directed. Each member must perform it correctly. No one, save the 
highest medicine men and village grandmothers, are exempt. It is a strange per- 
formance for the relatively civilized emigrees to Washington Heights. But it is a 
harmless enough diversion from their more pedestrian activities, i.e. organizing the 
Hematuria Hayride, planning for the "Guaiac Follies — 1959" fete, and selecting 
a field for the traditional meet with Sickle Cell Prep. (Thev were smeared all over 
the place last year, but are rounding up into good shape now.) 

Other minor incidents of personal note should be recorded before drawing a 
close to third year events: 



DOROTHY H. ANDERSEN, PROFES- 
SOR OF PATHOLOGY. I think every 
child should have a Sweat Test. 



CONRAD M. RILEY. ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. If it isn't 
Riley-Day, it's hound to be . . . 




I 



/TV. 




68 





SIDNEY BLL'MENTHAL. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF 
CLINICAL PEDIATRICS. Let me give my heart to you. 



CHARLES D. MAY. CLINICAL PRO- 
FESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. I hate to dis- 
agree with so gracious and learned a lady, 
but . . . 



Moroff launched an Eisenhower fan club. 

Trunnel attended an Ivy League football game Ion a lost bet). 

Robbins electrocuted 3 crayfish with synaptic energy isolated from 19 others. 

Neuhardt completed a Daily News crossword puzzle I lefty ) . 

Canellos got lost in Harvard Square. ( Coats gave him directions. | 

Heller was caught improving his lie in the rough, but swore on a stack of 
6 bulldogs that it was a highly localized earthquake that jarred his ball up onto 
a tee that happened to be planted there. 

The Rowlands denied reading "Invitation to a Beheading" before a coroner, 
but promised to keep their next cat away from the Murphy bed. 

Korhammer sued the U. S. Postal Service for losing an issue of Sports Illus- 
trated. 



All's quiet on Babies 8. 




WILLIAM A. SILVERMAN, ASSOCIATE PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL PEDIATRICS. In 10 
years I'll have proof about these premies. There 
have been no statistical studies so far. AH of 
these children should be in the study gronp. 



1 




69 




JOHN M. BRUSH. 
ASSOCIATE CLIN- 
ICAL PROFESSOR 
OF PEDIATRICS. I've 
a shocking story to tell 
you. 




DOUGLAS S. DAM- 
ROSCH. ASSOCIATE 
CLINICAL PROFES- 
SOR OF PEDIAT- 
RICS. T.B. in the 
ear? 




CHARLES L. WOOD, ASSOCIATE JAMES A. WOLFF. ASSOCIATE GILBERT W. MELLIN. ASSISTANT PROFES- 

CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF PED- CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF PED- SOR OF PEDIATRICS. Which twin has the 

IATRICS. 5 out of 10 New York IATRICS. I'll bet your hemoglobin Toni? 

doctors ... is at least 6. 



Not by us! 



MELVIN M. GRUMBACH, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. He, She or It? 





70 





WILLIAM A. BAUMAN, ASSIST- 
ANT CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF 
PEDIATRICS. I'm in charge of the 
A Clinic, not Miss McCarthy. 



RUTH C. HARRIS. ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF PEDIATRICS. 
Bilirubin and Transaminase, Caro- 
tene, Cholesterol. I will have a 
ball: I will do them all. and when 
I'm through I'll do them all again. 




The student 



The clinicians 



The tired one 



RALPH E. MOLOS- 
HOK. ASSISTANT 
CLINICAL PROFES- 
SOR OF PEDIAT- 
RICS. Little girls 
with big penises. little 
boys with small penis- 
es — What's the dif- 
ference? Lets get a 24 
hr. 1x14) urine collec- 
tion and see. 




WILLIAM A. BLANC. 
ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF PATH- 
OLOGY. What pecu- 
liar ears you have! 




71 





Left: WILLIAM B. SEAMAN, PROFESSOR OF RADI- 
OLOGY, EXECUTIVE OFFICER. You mean this is only 
a world ol shadows? Above: EDITH H. QL'IMBY. PRO- 
FESSOR OF RADIOLOGY. No.no! Springtime does not 
alter the 1131 uptake. 

The fourth year, that consummation of intellect and imagination, intensity and 
dedication, creativity and durability, was primarily uneventful. It was apparent 
by September that coffee consumption would reach a new high and book sales a 
new low. A few souls journeyed to Africa and South America (unwittingly, while 
searching for parking space) and returned with a collection of monkeys, boils, 
fevers, stories (Just-So and So-SoJ, and summons from the Limpopo Traffic Bureau. 
Other bon vivants, seeking a retreat to more contemplative and serene realms of 
existence, availed themselves of the Bellevue Acres estate, a club subsidiary. This 
establishment, only 15 minutes from Times Square, provided elegant accommodations, 
an enlightened clientele, and fastidious surroundings for all w-ho had the good 
fortune to enter its domain. Monthly excursions to Camp Coopertown, St. Luke's 
Spa, L'Eau D : Or, and the Roosevelt House were also arranged by the central com- 
mittee. 

JOHN CAFFEY, PROFESSOR OF RADI- 



JUAN M. TAVERAS, PROFESSOR OF 
RADIOLOGY. The course ol the anterior 
choroidal artery is similar to that ol the 
Blue Danuhe. 



41m 



OLOGY. Trauma to the growing skeleton 
occurs before medical school age, where- 
as trauma to the mind .. . 






72 




Above: DAVID H. 
PROFESSOR OF 
DR. CAFFEY. No 
forized: you can 
Above, right: KEN 
PROFESSOR OF 
it could be normal 
TIMER ALPERT. 
OLOGY. You can' 
out a program. 



BAKER. ASSISTANT 
RADIOLOGY, WITH 
the thymus is not san- 
hrink it with cortisone. 
T ELLIS, ASSISTANT 
RADIOLOGY. I think 
, but . . . Right: MOR- 
ASSOCIATE IN RADI- 
t tell an os calcis with- 





Below: RALPH SCHLAEGER, ASSOCI- 
ATE IN RADIOLOGY. But this is a chest 
x-ray! Right: I'll never find out where 
I'm supposed to be, in time. Below, right: 
V> e've been at this for three days ; let's 
get some chow. 





73 






Above, left: HOWARD C. TAYLOR. PROFESSOR OF 
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, EXECUTIVE OFFI- 
CER. Is that what you think of my department? Above: 
D. ANTHONY D'ESOPO. PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL 
OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. Yes, Miss Jones, you 
are pregnant. 




ANNA L. SOUTHAM. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. You shave 
only every other day; that's 
wonderful ! 



GILBERT J. VOSBURGH, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. I take medical students" 
wives — not their girl friends. 



ALBERT A. PLENTL. ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF OB- 
STETRICS AND GYNECOL. 
OGY. Are you being purposely 



The service was active. 



Informal student 



nclave 





75 




/^ 





Above, hit: SAUL B. GUSBERG. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY. ... so vou want to be a gynecologist. Above: CHARLES M. STEER. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTEtRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. The gynecoid 
pelvis — the most wonderful organ in the bodv. Above, rigkt: STANLEY" M. BYSSHE. ASSO- 
CIATE PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. Acute preceptorial 
degeneration? Below, left: EQUINN W. MUNNELL. ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR 
OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. Norman spontaneous delivery, what's that? Below, 
right: WILLIAM V. CAVANAGH. ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR OF OBSTETRICS 
AND GYNECOLOGY. The 75 mm. size is most common. It comes in a tuck-away kit. 





During most of this time. Hollander kept running around and mumbling great 
plans about a yearbook. Nobody had the heart to disillusion him, but all knew 
that the project would never get off the ground. 

Clearly the probational period for the hundred and twenty w r as drawing to a 
close. A wonderful roulette extravaganza called ''Matching Program" made a big 
splash. The National Board Challenge Tournament lasted two days. Everyone 
performed in a spectacular fashion BECAUSE such a simple-minded exercise is 
devoid of ambiguity and is designed to reward excellence no matter how good or 
bad such excellence might be. 



Yearbook production headquarters. 



Acute student apathy. 





HAROLD M. TOVELL, ASSOCI- 
ATE IN OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY, with DR. WIL- 
LIAM OBER. Do you think it's 
viable. 




74 




Look who's a radiologist! 




j ; 



Miss Messier. Do you think one case 
a day is too many? 



7 < 


[ A 




V*'- 










^_^^^^h^b 




ALVIN J. B. TILLMAN, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTE- 
TRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. We 
don't know anything about toxemia, 
and in 9 hours I'll prove it. 




LANDRUM B. SHETTLES, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. Lets see now, was it a boy or 
a girl? 



CLINTON P. O'CONNELL, ASSISTANT PRO- 
FESSOR OF CLINICAL OBSTETRICS AND 
GYNECOLOGY. You knucklehead! 



SAMUEL SOLOMON, ASSISTANT PROFES- 
OR OF BIOCHEMISTRY. Sheila should see 



HAROLD SPEERT, ASISSTANT PROFESSOR 
OF CLINICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNE- 
COLOGY. This is the iinest book on obstetrics 
I've ever seen. 





76 



The final event took place in the P & S gardens. There, amidst solemnitude 
broken only by the swats of Suarez's racket crashing in first services, graduation 
ceremonies were held. The day was tranquil, the immediate neighborhood devoid 
of rumbles, the orations enlightening. The group filed out slowly. Individuals 
paused only to smell a flower or to ask Hollander for a yearbook or their five 
dollars back. He glumly persisted in the fantasv that a publication would yet be 
available, but those who looked deeply into his eyes could not be sure that even he 
was completely convinced. 

Editor's note: The above polysyllabic diarrhea is the product of the not too 
fertile imagination of Stephen Goldfinger and the remainder of the staff hereby 
abjures the above prognostications and pronouncements. 

Benediction 

(With apologies to J. G. W.) 



Blessings on thee, young M. D., 
Pride of the university. 
Among thy varied interests, 
Properdin and fixation tests, 
Aldosterone and P. E. P.'s, 
Multiple endocrinopathies, 
Amyloidosis of the tongue. 
Perfusion pressures of the lung. 
Self-assured, with air serene, 
Master of the fava bean! 



Oh, for clerkship's painless terrors. 
All things stem from inborn errors — 
Mindless of those future days 
Of belly aches and C. V. A.'s. 
At that time whole weeks may pass 
When everyone presents with "gas". 
And, defying all credulity, 
Grippe will be commoner than L-E. 
When plagues of hiccups shall descend 
Upon thee: what to recommend? 



Prince thou art — the L. M. D. 

Says, "syndrome" instead of "syndrome", 

Eats bananas without fear 

Of flushes, wheeze, or diarrhea, 

Does not move with lightning haste 

When noticing a lens displaced 

To survey murmurs, joints, — besides, 

Mucopolysaccharides. 



In the months and years ahead 
Prepare to wake up from thy bed. 
In order to provide a cure 
For sniffles, aches, and "temperature" 
Then to work-up and appraise 
Itches, drips, and mild malaise. 
(That little tot with too much wee-wee 
Just might not be a Letterer-Siwe. ) 
A butterfly rash -- might it arise 
From sensitivity to butterflies. 



Before thou leave this sunny clime 
Regard thy textbooks one more time, 
Ere blotters and calendars decree 
The latest in pharmacology. 
Think ahead. Develop skill in 
Withholding patients from penicillin. 
As graduation day approaches, 
Defend thyself. Forget past coaches. 
Words of advice are oft not heeded. 
(But blessings on thee might be needed.) 



Stephen Goldfinger 



77 




Front row, left to right: John Sheagren, Frederick Guggenheim, Carl Brunjes. Second row: Frederick Grossman, Howard 
Corning, Otto Pfluger, Jr., Seth Harvey, Hugh Clark, James Gale, Robert Mulcare. 



Front Row, left to right: William Schwartzman, Betty Danes, David Whaley. Second row: William Luika^t, Stanley Luftschein, 
Robert Neer, Thomas Devel, Charles Watson, Stephen Terry, Richard Weil III, Arthur Lemlich, James Robinson. Third roiv: 
John Robinson, Peter Milheiser, Leon Skolnick, Bart Troy, Alan Wanderer, Donald Marcuse, Francis O'Connell. 




Third Year 




Front roiv, left to right: James Philip, Eric Weber, Helen Redman, John Ryan, Thomas Mack, Mayer Lightdale. Second row: 
Benjamin Nachamie, William Stouch, Ronald Maenza, Arnold Marglin, Marjorie Tucker, Jane Sehwartzberg, Susan Standfast, Arth- 
ur Meyerson, John Rosen, William Po-well, Richard Thurer, James Meyer. Third row: Irvin Teran, Paul Reich, Louis Sherwood, 
Walter Morgan, William Rcichel, Stephen Wanger, John Talbott, Philip Stuart, Luther Strayer III. 



79 



P & S Club 




Rev. Edwin M. Barton, Director. 





Bard Hall, home of the P & S Club. 




Student-Faculty Conferences, such as Dr. Seegal's St. Pat- 
rick's Day talk: Concerts, often arranged with the assistance 
of Madame Lhevine, such as the Fuschi piano recital; 
Vespers, Films and other events serve to supplement the 
regular non-academic activities sponsored by the club. 






AO A 



"The aims of the Society shall be the promotion 
of scholarship and research in medical school, the 
encouragement of a high standard of character and 
conduct among medical students, and the recognition 
of high attainment in medical science, practice and 
related fields." 




Stanley H. Appel 

Jesse Arthur Blumenthal 

Peter Braun 

Peter Jacob Cohen 

George Norman Forker 

Stephen Edward Goldfinger 

Evan Manuel Hersh 

Matthew Joel Janin 

Laurus Waldemar Lehwalder 

Sandra Louise Mogil 



Saul Victor Moroff 
Harvey Ronald Nova 
Joost Joe Oppenheim 
Audrey Shields Penn 
Ronald Chester Picoff 
Jay Howard Robbins 
Ora M. Rosen 
Thomas Graves Smith, Jr. 
Rosalind Hilsen Troupin 
David Emery Wolfe 




Say Friedbcrg! 







-' 



\ 












a ' 





i 




*). 







5. 




J& 






km Jd 

j _ HI 


1 





YEARBOOK 


SPONSORS 


Frederick R. Bailey, M.D. 


Robert F. Loeb, M.D. 


Stanley E. Bradley, M.D. 


Rustin Mcintosh, M.D. 


Harold W. Brown, M.D. 


H. Houston Merritt, M.D. 


Stuart W. Cosgriff, M.D. 


George A. Perera, M.D. 


A. Gerard DeVoe, M.D. 


Kermit L. Pines, M.D. 


Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr., M.D. 


Calvin H. Plimpton, M.D. 


Carl R. Feind, M.D. 


J. Lawrence Pool, M.D. 


Edmund Fowler, Jr., M.D. 


Charles A. Ragan, Jr., M.D. 


Virginia Kneeland Frantz, M.D. 


Helen Ranney, M.D. 


Magnus 1. Gregersen, M.D. 


Dickinson W. Richards, M.D. 


David V. Habif, M.D. 


Harry M. Rose, M.D. 


Robert B. Hiart, M.D. 


William B. Seaman, M.D. 


William A. Horwitz, M.D. 


Beatrice Seegal, M.D. 


George H. Humphreys II, M.D. 


David Seegal, M.D. 


Yale Kneeland, M.D. 


Anna L. Southam, M.D. 


Lawrence C. Kolb, M.D. 


Joseph C. Turner, M.D. 


Raffaele Lattes, M.D. 


Carmine T. Vicale, M.D. 


Melvin D. Yah 


-, M.D. 


The Yearbook Staff 




Joshua Hollander, Editor 




Charles Nelson Leach, Jr., Business Manager 




Jesse Blumenthal 




Stephen Edward Goldfinger 
Richard Scott Milligan 
Marc J. Taylor 


CENS-JARBOE, INC 


Acknowledgements 


BUILDERS 


H. G. Roebuck and Son, Inc., Printers 




Henry Verby, Official Portrait Photographer 
Edwin M. Barton 




The Deans, Mrs. Bodine, & Mrs. Daly 




Public Information, & Elizabeth Wilcox 




Alumni Secretary 




Mary Gaglio, Sheila Horwitz, Priscilla Kao, 
Arthur Lennon 


101 PARK AVENUE 




NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 


MEDICAL CENTER 




NURSERY SCHOOL 




626 W. 165 St., nr. Ft. Wash. Ave. 





85 



■ 

SCHERING 


products of 
original Schering research 




1 ALLIED WITH 

PHYSICIANS 

i IN RESEARCH 

ACAI N ST 
• DISEASE 






1 


DERONIL® 


^ 


w 


POLARAMINE® 


METICORTEN® 


FULVICIN™ 


CHLOR-TRIMETON® 


MIRADON® 


METI-DERM® 


TRILAFON® 


RELA™ 


DELENAR® 



86 



HENRY VERBY 

OFFICIAL PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER 

FOR 

THE P & S YEARBOOK OF 1960 
Recognized for Quality 

2884 Broadway, New York 25, N. Y. 
UN. 4-3877 

We keep negatives of your photographs on file 
for many years after graduation. 

PROMPT ATTENTION TO 
MAIL AND PHONE ORDERS 



87 



L^omplimentd 
of- the 

P&S 

ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION 



To each member of the Class of 1960 
the P & S Alumni Association extends 
its best wishes for a happy and suc- 
cessful career. 



Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. P & S '19, President 



88 



HEIGHTS 
CAMERA CENTER 

The Leading Brands in Photographic 

Equipment and Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality in Photo Finishing 
Done on Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

Between 1 7 1 si and 172nd Streets 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 
WA. 3-3698 



CRUNE & STRATTON 
INCORPORATED 

MEDICAL PUBLISHERS 

Practical texts and manuals by outstanding 
men; and journals that bring you current 
advances in specialized fields. 

Write for complete catalog 

381 PARK AVENUE SOUTH 
NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 



Extends its Sincerest Good Wishes 



to 



THE CLASS OF 1960 



89 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



BARD HALL 



90 



The NEW YORK STATE JOURNAL OF MEDICINE welcomes 
you to the profession. It wishes you well for the future. 

It hopes that wherever you are, wherever your practice 
carries you, its pages may bring you information and knowledge 
which will be useful to you through the years ahead. 

NEW YORK STATE JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 

750 THIRD AVENUE NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

Special subscription rate for interns and residents 
$5.00 per year — 24 issues 


Compliments of 

A & P 

170th St. and St. Nicholas Ave. 


JOHN W. BUNGER 

GROCER 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

226 Fort Washington Avenue 
Corner 169th Street 


Tel. LOrain 8-1230 Nick Tsakiridis 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 
4021 Broadway, New York 32, N. Y. 


Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 

D. APPEL 

EXPERT TAILOR 
CLEANERS and DYERS 

230 Ft. Washington Avenue 
Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 


WAshington Heights 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 

Electronically Tested Watch Repairs 

4009 Broadway New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 


UPTOWN SHOE REPAIRING 

Hah Repairing and Shoe Shine Parlor 
4031 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Phil, Sal and Fred Bozzo 



91 



Haircut or a Manicure 

DOMINGO CUEVAS 
BARBER SHOP 

Six Experts 

4005 Broadway nr. 169th St. 
WAdsworth 8-4910 

The Barber Shop Nearest 
The Medical Center 

REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway cor. 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 



24-Hour Service 



WAdsworth 7-8300 




Oxygen Equipped and Air Conditioned 

2- Way Radio Dispatched 

Efficient Attendants 

We meet Ships, Trains & Planes 

Transportation of 
Chronic Invalids 

Prompt Dependable Service 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 

Specia//st in 
INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 



233 Broadway, New York 7, N. Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 

STUYVESANT SQUARE 
THRIFT SHOP 

1406 Third Ave., New York 21, N. Y. 

(S.W. Cor. 80th St.) 

For Pick-Up Call 
SWinburne 5-3638 

Donations are Tax Deductible 

The Women's Auxiliary of the Presbyterian Hospital 



WESTCHESTER 
FARMS 

INCORPORATED 



430 EAST 108th STREET 

NEW YORK 29, N. Y. 

LE. 4-4560 



92 



With the Qompliments of 

SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS 



Division of SANDOZ, INC. 
Hanover, New Jersey 



93 



THE INTERNAL CLOCK 

The ability to judge intervals of time is a basic 
mental function. In order to learn how drugs 
affect this "internal clock," SK&F scientists 
use a test in which a monkey must hit a lever 
after an interval of 20 seconds to obtain food. 
When he is under the influence of certain 
drugs, "time flies" and he misses the pay-off 
period by hitting the lever too late. Other drugs 
make "time drag" and he misses the pay-off 
period by hitting the lever too soon. 



Because one of the characteristics of many 
mental disorders is a distortion of the time 
sense, observing how drugs affect this primary 
psychological process may reveal valuable in- 
formation that will help SK&F scientists in dis- 
covering effective treatments for mental illness. 

SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES 

pioneering in pharmaceuticals . . . 
for better health 




94 



TASTY DELICATESSEN 

FOR EXPERT CATERING 

Call WA. 3-0700 
4020 Broadway at 169th St. 


WAdsworth 7-5700 Lie. 532 

M. CITARELLA, INC. 

WINES and LIQUORS 
Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 Broadway nr. 164th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 


Courtesy Cards 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

Jacob Kaplan, Ph.G. WA. 3-1258 

4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th Sts. 
New York City 

Specialists in Prescription Compounding 


SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway cor. 168th Street 


ARMORY 
BAR and GRILL 


Phone WAdsworth 7-5314 

Flowers For All Occasions 

CHRIS'S FLOWERS 

4029 Broadway bet. 169th & 170th Sts. 

George & Stella 


MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3958 Broadway, opp. Medical Center 

FILMS DEVELOPED ON PREMISES 
FOR PEOPLE WHO CARE 

LO. 8-8590 


WA. 3-2424 'Soy It With Flowers' 

MEDICAL CENTER 
FLOWER SHOP 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

Artistic Decorations For All Occasions 
The Flower Shop Nearest Medical Center 

"WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 


Broadway at 165th St., New York 32, N. Y. 
WA. 3-9110, 3-9230 

Center Restaurant and Bar 

ITALIAN — AMERICAN CUISINE 
Our Pizzas Are "Tops in the Heights" 


MEDICAL CENTER 

NURSERY SCHOOL 

626 W. 165 St., nr. Ft. Wash. Ave. 



95 




a£ fate dKKccad fax ic^ati 
and catiepet everywhere. 



Established 1919 



H. G. Roebuck & Son, Inc. 

PRINTERS • LITHOGRAPHERS 



2140 Aisquith Street- 
Baltimore 18, Md. 
HOpkins 7-6700 



PROUD PRODUCERS OF YOUR ANNUAL 






96 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0064277640